The Poorest Countries In The World 2021

The Poorest Countries In The World 2021
The Poorest Countries In The World 2021

Over 721 million people are predicted to live on less than $1.90 per day, the World Bank’s extreme poverty level. While this is an improvement over previous years, it still represents more than 9% of the global population. Moreover, the poverty of this nature tends to concentrate in places with relatively low incomes.

The Poorest Countries In The World 2021, the sum of money earned by a country’s population and enterprises in a given year is known as gross national income. Income earned by corporations or individuals based in a specific country but operating outside its borders are included. GNI is a valuable metric for determining a country’s entire income. The metric aids in determining which countries are the wealthiest and poorest in the world.

24/7 Wall St. reviewed statistics on gross national income per capita for 193 countries and particular regions, as well as data from the World Bank, to determine the world’s poorest countries.

 

The Poorest Countries In The World 2021

 

10. Chad

  • GNI per capita: $1,580
  • 2020 GDP: $10.1 billion
  • Life expectancy: 54.2 years
  • Population: 16.4 million

Chad is one of the world’s poorest countries, with a per capita GNI of $1,580. This amounts to less than a tenth of the global GNI per capita. Because of a lack of money and resources, low-income countries like Chad frequently experience serious health problems.

Along with South Sudan, Chad is one of only two countries where fewer than 10% of the population has access to electricity. It may be challenging to administer health care as a result of this. Only three nations in the world have a maternal mortality rate of more than 1,000 deaths per 100,000 live births. The maternal mortality rate in the globe is 211 deaths per 100,000 live births.

 

9. Malawi

  • GNI per capita: $1,540
  • 2020 GDP: $12.0 billion
  • Life expectancy: 64.3 years
  • Population: 19.1 million

Malawi’s economy is in worse shape than practically every other country on the planet. It has a per capita GNI of $1,540. To put things in perspective, the US GNI per capita is roughly 43 times higher.

Over 82 percent of Malawi’s 19.1 million people live in rural areas, isolating them from health care and economic possibilities.
Malawi has the world’s second-highest proportion of people living in extreme poverty, at 69.2 percent. The global rate of extreme poverty is 9.3 percent.

 

8. Madagascar

  • GNI per capita: $1,540
  • 2020 GDP: $13.7 billion
  • Life expectancy: 67.0 years
  • Population: 27.7 million

Madagascar is tied for eighth place in the world with Malawi, another African country. The GNI per capita in both countries is $1,540. Only a few countries in the world have a lower GNI per capita than the United States. Less than a quarter of Madagascar’s population has access to power, and gaining access can take up to a year.

The unemployment rate in Madagascar is under 1.9 percent. While this appears to be a favourable economic statistic, impoverished countries may have meagre unemployment rates because many employees are employed in agriculture, forestry, and fisheries, often seasonal and pay little.

 

7. Liberia

  • GNI per capita: $1,250
  • 2020 GDP: $3.0 billion
  • Life expectancy: 64.1 years
  • Population: 5.1 million

Liberia has a GNI per capita of $1,250, which is among the lowest in the world. Liberia has been plagued by conflict and political unrest in recent years; however, the situation appears to be improving. George Weah, a former soccer player, was elected president in 2017, marking the country’s first democratic transfer of power in many years.

Despite this, Liberia faces numerous challenges on its path to development. For example, only 27.6% of the population has access to power, and it takes 482 days to receive electricity in the country, making it the world’s most extended wait. In addition, approximately 52% of Liberians aged 15 and up are illiterate, compared to 13.5 percent of the world’s population at that age.

 

6. Mozambique

  • GNI per capita: $1,250
  • 2020 GDP: $14.0 billion
  • Life expectancy: 60.9 years
  • Population: 31.3 million

With a GNI per capita of $1,250 in 2020, Mozambique is tied with Liberia as the world’s sixth poorest country. Moreover, 60% of the population of Mozambique lives in rural areas, with only 30% of individuals having access to power.

Like only three other of the world’s poorest countries, Mozambique derives a significant portion of its exports. Goods and service exports make for 29.5 percent of global economic production. Exports make for 41 percent of Mozambique’s GDP. Coal briquettes, aluminum, petroleum gas, gold, tobacco, and other products were among the country’s almost $5.7 billion worth of exports in 2019.

 

5. Niger

  • GNI per capita: $1,210
  • 2020 GDP: $13.7 billion
  • Life expectancy: 62.4 years
  • Population: 24.2 million

With a GNI per capita of $1,210, Niger is the world’s fifth poorest country. More than 80% of Niger’s population lives in rural areas, and agriculture is the country’s economic lifeblood: agriculture, forestry, and fishery account for 37.8% of GDP in Niger, compared to 3.5 percent globally. However, agriculture-dependent countries are often not economically affluent.

Niger’s future growth potential may be hampered by limited access to health care, energy, and economic possibilities. For example, only 35% of residents aged 15 and above are literate, and fewer than 19% have access to electricity.

 

4. the Democratic Republic of the Congo

  • GNI per capita: $1,100
  • 2020 GDP: $49.9 billion
  • Life expectancy: 60.7 years
  • Population: 89.6 million

The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is a vast African country in the continent’s heart. Yet, it is one of the world’s poorest countries, with a GNI per capita of only $1,100. Corruption is most certainly one of the elements contributing to this low-income level. In addition, corruption can hinder economic progress by reducing efficiency and disincentivizing innovation. According to Transparency International, the DRC is one of the most corrupt countries in the world.

Residents in low-income countries may have difficulty accessing proper health care. Child mortality, maternal mortality, and tuberculosis rates in the country are all more than twice as high as global.

 

3. the Central African Republic

  • GNI per capita: $1,040
  • 2020 GDP: $2.3 billion
  • Life expectancy: 53.3 years
  • Population: 4.8 million

With a GNI per capita of just over $1,000, the Central African Republic is the world’s third poorest country. In addition, only 37.4 percent of individuals aged 15 and over are literate, and 14.3 percent of all residents have access to electricity, limiting opportunities for education and economic progress.

Many of the same health issues plague the Central African Republic as they do other underdeveloped countries. For example, it has the shortest life expectancy of any country on the planet, at 53.3 years, over two decades less than the global average. The government also has some of the world’s highest child mortality, maternal mortality, and tuberculosis cases.

 

2. Somalia

  • GNI per capita: $870
  • 2020 GDP: $4.9 billion
  • Life expectancy: 57.4 years
  • Population: 15.9 million

Somalia is one of just two countries with a GNI per capita of less than $1,000, out of 193 countries for which data is available. More than two-thirds of Somalis live on less than $1.90 a day.

Both are severe difficulties in Somalia; corruption and governmental disorganization are two elements that can stymie a country’s overall economic well-being. Somalia is the world’s most corrupt country, according to Transparency International. In addition, Somalia has been without a functioning central government for decades. Though the nation faces rebel attacks from Islamist extremist organizations such as Al-Shabab, an internationally recognized government was established in 2012.

 

1. Burundi

  • GNI per capita: $780
  • 2020 GDP: $3.3 billion
  • Life expectancy: 61.6 years
  • Population: 11.9 million

Burundi is a landlocked East African country. With a gross national income per capita of just $780, it is by far the world’s poorest country, with a fraction of the global GNI per capita of $17,535.

Exports account for a considerable portion of GDP in most of the world’s wealthiest countries, often much over the global average of 29.5 percent. Despite this, Burundi’s exports account for only 5.0 percent of its GDP, the lowest of any country. Burundi has the world’s second-highest percentage of people living in rural areas, at more than 86 percent. Burundi’s $3.3 billion GDP is made up of 28.5 percent agriculture and allied businesses. Agriculture accounts for only 3.5 percent of global economic production.