Tips For Choosing College Classes

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The college experience is about a bunch of things. It’s about growing up, forging friendships, finding love, and charting a path for yourself. But more than anything it’s still school! Just because you’re not in high school anymore, doesn’t mean you don’t have to make academic decisions. So, choosing college classes is one of the most important things to get right while you’re there.

The right set of college classes can mean the difference between falling in love with a new subject or field or absolutely dreading (and failing) your 9 a.m. Organic Chemistry for Non-Majors class.

 

8. Register early

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The earlier you register, the more likely it is that you’ll get the classes you want. Also, if a problem comes up along the way, you’ll have more time to deal with it. But no matter how early you register, make sure you have a list of back-up classes in case the ones you want are already full.

 

7. Take a writing course

student writing an essay
student writing an essay

Plan to take a writing class during your first semester, even if it’s not required. Good writing skills will be important in all your classes—and in whatever career you choose.

 

6. Use college credits and placement exams

college credits and placement exams
college credits and placement exams

If you’ve earned college credits in high school—for example, through the AP or IB programs—find out if you can use them to fulfill any core requirements before you register. You can also get out of required courses by scoring well on a college placement exam.

 

5. Maintain balance

Find Balance
Find Balance

You may want to jump into difficult classes as a freshman, but remember that college courses require more time and effort than high school classes. Start slowly and work up to harder classes. Also, choose classes that require different types of work so you don’t end up writing five papers or solving five problem sets in one week.

 

4. Get requirements out of the way

Core requirements
Core requirements

Core requirements range from math and history to philosophy and lab sciences. The number of required courses varies from one college to the next, but you should try to take most of these classes during your first two years so you can concentrate on your major later.

 

3. Visit your adviser

How to Become a College Advisor
How to Become a College Advisor

Some colleges have advisers who help students decide which classes to take. If you are assigned an adviser, try to meet before registration. Come with a list of questions. If your adviser can’t answer everything, contact the professors who teach the classes you want to take.

 

2. Create a schedule that works

Planning Your College Schedule
Planning Your College Schedule

Aim to sign up for four to six courses a semester. Try to spread them out over the week so you have time for studying and other activities each day and note when classes meet so you don’t double book yourself. If you find your schedule isn’t a good fit once school starts, you can change it during the first few weeks of classes.

 

1. Check out your options

Diploma versus GED
Newly named Bremerton High school graduates toss off their caps at Friday night’s ceremony at Memorial Stadium.

Review the course catalogue. If you know your major, choose some courses that fulfill general requirements in that area. If you’re not sure what you want to study, pick some classes in subjects that spark your interest.